How To Build The Dream Team For Any Creative Project

Written on 
September 3, 2021

When assembling your team, it is important to view the team as one entity, as well as the members as individuals.

The whole should be greater than the sum of its parts - so ensuring you assemble the best possible combination of talent for your creative projects is key!

To be able to do that, it is essential to have a primed creative network spanning all of your functional requirements with the breadth of skill ready to tackle any project. Equally important to the caliber of your contacts is having a substantial quantity of each skill to call in additional talent when required for urgent projects without having to pull people out of existing work or overstretching your team. The best practice is to view your creative network as something you actively and continuously focus on developing, expanding and nurturing. You can never have enough contacts within your professional portfolio - there are always new and niche skills, and improved representation to strive for. For more on how to cultivate your creative network to set you up for success, check out ‘The Importance of Growing your Creative Network’.

So when you think about building a ‘dream team’, who are the key players? An obvious core role is Project Leader. They should have experience in creating the specific output for the project in question - and this should take precedence over wanting to use someone internally for ease and familiarity. So if there isn’t someone within your creative team who has worked successfully with the medium of video, it is always better to outsource the role to someone with the right experience. Rather than viewing this as an additional expense or inconvenience, recognize that this will save you resources, time, and unnecessary revisions in the project lifecycle. In addition to the key components of a creative team, specific projects may require specialized roles or consultants to be brought in to achieve the desired outcome.

When assembling your team, it is important to view the team as one entity, as well as the members as individuals. Select talent that you know have good working relationships, have collaborated together before (where possible) and can synergize effectively to produce the best outcome. Avoid any creatives that have historically has sharp artistic differences or clashed on either personal or professional levels! Equally as important as their ability to co-create is ensuring enough diversity to represent different ways of thinking to challenge each other in a healthy way to produce the best results. To help inform this, it is very useful to review project performance after completion so that you have a record of teams that whom have worked successfully together and can be called upon again in the future to collaborate again.

Building great teams is as much about them wanting to work with you as you wanting to work with them; if you curate warm and desirable work environments, and make people feel happy and excited to work with you, you will be able to retain the best talent. Creative Relationship Management, as we call it, is the art of treating your talent as valued individuals and cultivating good relationships with them, as opposed to treating them as resources at your disposal.

Leading on from this, a simple way to improve your Creative Relationship Management is to ensure you are showing your talent that you respect and value them by keeping on top of admin and paying them in a timely fashion. As passionate as creatives are about their craft, they also need to pay the bills and make a reliable living. It pays to pay them on time!

Once you have your dream team, ensuring they can collaborate successfully will set them up to achieve the best results. If you want to chat about how Atellio can support your creative teams, drop me an email at Nick@atellio.com.

Latest articles

Take control of your creativity

Join the D&AD, Cannes Lions and Oscar winning studios running on Atellio

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.